Discover Your Style

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Single Hung Window
Single Hung Window

Operates with the bottom sash being manipulated. Since this type of window does not open outwards, it is a perfect choice of window for small spaces like windows facing pathways, streets and other narrow spaces.

Double Hung Window
Double Hung Window

Both the upper and lower sashes slide open vertically and tilt in for easy cleaning. This is the most common type of window in American houses because of its practicality and functionality.

Casement Window
Casement Window

Hinged windows that opens inwards or outwards from the sides to allow for excellent ventilation.

Awning Window
Awning Window

Tilts outwards and prevents it from limiting the size of the room, but can not be installed where plants and other barriers of the space outside of the wall can prevent the window from opening.

Hopper Window
Hopper Window

Opens by tilting vertically inwards the house. Hoppers, usually horizontal rectangles, are hinged in the bottom which allows the tilting of the window to open from the top.

Storm Window
Storm Window

A storm window is mounted on the outside or the inside of the main glass window. The second barrier on top of the original window helps keep the house warm during winter and cool during summer. This unique architecture and design creates a solid seal that helps in the improvement of your home’s insulation while it protects it from outside elements.

Two-Panel Slider Window
Two-Panel Slider Window

Two panels where one or both of the panels are slided left and right to allow ventilation into the room.

Three-Panel Slider Window
Three-Panel Slider Window

The three-panel slider has the middle panel fixed, while the other two side panels slide to the middle to open and close the window.

Transoms Window
Transoms Window

Great for beautifying your home while allowing natural light to enter. Provides good ventilation and insulation.

Oriel Window
Oriel Window

The oriel is a type of bay window that is commonly used in the upper floors/stories that are supported by brackets, corbels or similar. This type of windows extends the area of the room exteriorly.

Cottage Window
Cottage Window

A variation of the double hung window where the upper stash is shorter than the lower one. Also known as the “Georgian” and “Tudor” type of window.

Picture Window
Picture Window

One of the most unique form of windows since it is fixed (can not be manipulated). It is just a glass window pane which has the main purpose of framing an outside view–like a picture frame.

Egress Window
Egress Window

This type of window provides a safe escape route from your home in case of emergencies such as fire, earthquake, etc. It also serves as an access point for emergency personnel.

Garden Window
Garden Window

Four-sided window that extends outward to be able to capture enough amount of sunlight needed by plants.

Glass Block Window
Glass Block Window

Frosted glass blocks come with an obscured view to maintain your privacy. Equipped with a thick and durable finish that provides extra security to your homes and offices.

Deadlites Window (Sash Only)
Deadlites Window (Sash Only)

A very affordable type of window since it has only one sash. Highly energy-efficient like picture window.

Bay Window
Bay Window

This has an outward frame, commonly hexagonal, which adds space to your room and creates the illusion of a curved wall.

Bow Window
Bow Window

A variation of the bay window where the only difference is instead of having hexagonal and straight edges, the bow window is curved, forming an arch. Because of the curved edges, this type of window is typically larger than bay windows.

Arched Window
Arched Window

Common on Roman architecture but its timeless beauty offers a unique look to modern structures. It increases the curb appeal of your home’s exterior despite being low-maintenance.